Physiological Changes and Benefits from Strength Training

Physiological Changes and Benefits from Strength Training

CHANGE BENEFITS

Increased muscle mass and strength Increased muscular strength Improved body composition Higher rate of metabolism Improved capacity to regulate fuel use with aging Toned, healthy-looking muscles Increased longevity Improved quality of life

Increased utilization of motor units during muscle contractions Increased muscular strength and power

Improved coordination of motor units Increased muscular strength and power

Increased strength of tendons, ligaments, and bones Lower risk of injury to these tissues

Increased storage of fuel in muscles Increased resistance to muscle fatigue

Increased size of fast-twitch muscle fibers (from a high-resistance program) Increased muscular strength and power

Increased size of slow-twitch muscle fibers (from a high-repetition program) Increased muscular endurance

Increased blood supply to muscles (from a high-repetition program) and improved blood vessel health Increased delivery of oxygen and nutrients Faster elimination of wastes

Physiological Changes and Benefits from Strength Training Photo Gallery



Biochemical improvements (for example, increased sensitivity to insulin) Enhanced metabolic health and, possibly, increased life span

Improved blood fat levels Reduced risk of heart disease

Increased muscle endurance Enhanced ability to exercise for long periods and maintain good body posture

Due to genetic and hormonal differences, men will build more muscle mass than women, but both genders make about the same percentage gains in strength through a good program.

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