Best Lower Body Kettlebell Exercises

Best Lower Body Kettlebell Exercises

A lifestyle that includes only the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life. A lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking about 1.5-3 miles per day at 3-4 miles per hour (30-60 minutes a day of moderate physical activity), in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life. fA lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking more than 3 miles per day at 3-4 miles per hour (60 or more minutes a day of moderate physical activity), in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2011. Dietary Guidelines for Americans,

2010, Appendix 6. Estimated Calorie Needs per Day by Age, Gender, and Physical Activity Level. (http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/ DietaryGuidelines/2010/PolicyDoc/PolicyDoc.pdf; retrieved March 25, 2013).

For the healthiest option and to limit calories and saturated fat in your diet, MyPlate’s key message for consumers is to switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk and dairy products.

Protein Foods (Meat and Beans) This group includes meat, poultry, fish, dried beans and peas, eggs, nuts, seeds, and processed soy products. A 2000-calorie diet should include 5% ounce-equivalents daily. Each of the following counts as equivalent to 1 ounce:

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• 1 ounce cooked lean meat, poultry, or fish

• 1 cup cooked beans (legumes) or tofu

• 1 egg

• 1 tablespoon peanut butter

• ounce nuts or seeds

Choose lean meats and skinless poultry, and watch your serving sizes carefully. Choose at least one serving of plant proteins, such as black beans, lentils, or tofu, every day. Include at least 8 ounces of cooked seafood per week and select a variety of protein foods to improve nutrient intake and health benefits.

Oils Oils and soft margarines include vegetable oils and soft vegetable oil table spreads that have no trans fats. These are major sources of vitamin E and unsaturated fatty acids, including the essential fatty acids. Oils and fats that are liquid at room temperature and come from many plants and fish sources are included in this list. A 2000-calorie diet should include 6 teaspoons of oils per day. One teaspoon is the equivalent of the following:

• 1 teaspoon vegetable oil or soft margarine

• 1 tablespoon salad dressing or light mayonnaise

Foods that are mostly oils include nuts, olives, avocados, and some fish. The following portions include about 1 teaspoon of oil: 4 large olives, Vi medium avocado, 2 tablespoons peanut butter, and 1 ounce roasted nuts. Food labels can help you identify the type and amount of fat in various foods.

Solid Fats and Added Sugars If you consistently choose nutrient-dense foods that are fat-free or low-fat and that contain no added sugars, you can also have a small amount of additional calories in the form of solid fats and added sugars (SoFAS). Figure 8.5 shows the maximum number of SoFAS calories allowed at each calorie level in MyPlate.

People who are trying to lose weight may choose not to use SoFAS calories. For those wanting to maintain weight, these calories may be used to increase the amount of food from a food group; to consume foods that are not in the lowest-fat form or that contain added sugars; to add oil, fat, or sugars to foods; or to consume alcohol.

The current American diet includes higher levels of calories in the form of solid fats and added sugars (SoFAS) than recommended. Added sugars contribute an average of 16 percent of the total calories in American diets primarily from sugar sweetened beverages such as soda, energy drinks and sports drinks, grain-based desserts, and sugar-sweetened fruit beverages. For those age 14-18, sodas and energy and sports drinks are the top source of calories in the diet, accounting for 226 calories per beverage; teens typically drink more than one such beverage daily. In particular, experts advise consumers to be wary of products containing high-fructose corn syrup. Although this sweetener is not harmful in itself, it is high in calories and very low in nutritional value. High-fructose corn syrup is found in many products, especially soft drinks and processed foods. Research has linked high consumption of high-fructose corn syrup with obesity, diabetes, and other health problems.

Physical Activity Like the Dietary Guidelines and other plans, MyPlate encourages physical activity for improving health, preventing chronic diseases, and managing weight. If you meet the Department of Health and Human Services’ guidelines of 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity, you will meet the recommendations found in MyPlate. To get the most health benefits, choose moderate physical activity such as brisk walking, cycling, and dancing, or vigorous activity such as running, swimming, basketball, or aerobics.

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