Vinyasa Flow Yoga Poses

Vinyasa Flow Yoga Poses

Latissimus Dorsi.

The Latissimus Dorsi is a powerful muscle in the lower and middle back. It originates at a number of different locations the lumber vertebrae, the lower six thoracic vertebrae, the iliac crest, the sacrum, the lower 3 or 4 ribs and the inferior angle of the scapula. It wraps around the lower and middle back to attach itself to the inertubercular groove of the humerus.

Middle & Lower Trapezius.

This picture shows the whole trapezius muscle. It can be broken down into the upper, middle and lower trapezius. The middle trapezius originates at the spinous process of C7, T1, T2 & T3 and attaches to the medial and upper border of the scapula. The lower trapezius originates from the spinous process of T4-T12 and attaches to the inferior medial border of the scapula.

Triceps Brachii.

The triceps are known as the “3 headed arm muscle” due to the muscle having 3 different origin points. The longest head of muscle originates from the infraglenoid tubercle of the scapula. The middle head originates from the dorsal surface of the humerus and the third head originates in close proximity to the middle head as it also originates on the back of the humerus bone from the greater tubercle down to the region of the lateral intermuscular septum.

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Opponens Pollicis Longus.

This muscle is found on in the inside of the palm and acts to flex the thumb towards the little finger. It originates on the tubercle of the trapezium bone and the flexor retinaculum and inserts onto the anterior and lateral surfaces of the shaft of the first metacarpal bone.

Asanas (Postures) for Late Summer.

The main aim with the late summer asana practices is to open the stomach and spleen channels on the front of the body, while strengthening and toning the muscles around the spine on the back of the body. Cultivating power and strength in the legs also helps to ground the system’s energy into the earth. The following pages explore some asanas that achieve this aim.

Incorporate these postures into your asana practice during late summer to stimulate the stomach and spleen.

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